Elizabeth Murnane
emurnane@stanford.edu

My high-level research goal is to design, deploy, and evaluate novel computing technologies that support well-being, broadly construed, at individual, group, and societal levels. My research style involves taking data-driven, evidence-based, mixed-method, and user-centered approaches to (a) increase our fundamental scientific understanding about human behaviors and experiences with respect to a domain of interest, (b) use such insights to inform the design of novel systems that aim to improve targeted outcomes, and (c) build and deploy these tools to study the impact in real-world settings. This iterative, “full stack” strategy enhances my ability to assess the merit, feasibility, and efficacy of an envisioned system, while foregrounding a deep empathy for the role of technology in a given context. In this way, I strive to make empirical, methodological, theoretical, and technical contributions — and crucially, have a concrete positive impact on people’s lives and overall well-being.

To pursue these directions, I collaborate with an amazing set of colleagues both from subfields of computing (e.g., computer vision, machine learning) and engineering (e.g., civil, mechanical), as well as domain experts from the behavioral and social sciences, humanities, medicine, and law. Meaningful and sustained engagement with community organizations (clinics, hospitals, schools, both local and national) is also key to enabling my research. My work is typically team-based; and I particularly love involving, advising, and mentoring students, as part of my commitment to training the next generation of scientists to address global grand challenges.

The star symbol () indicates projects that are currently most active; but I'm still strongly interested in and happy to discuss any ideas here, including opportunities for collaboration, if you'd like to reach out and connect (email works best).

Personal Health Informatics

At the intersection of mobile health, social computing, and personal informatics, these projects research the development of interactive self-report tools, passive sensing techniques, and end-to-end applications for monitoring and intervention.

Mental Health

I study the lived experiences and self-monitoring practices of individuals with mental health conditions in order to design and develop technology for assessment, therapy, and intervention that are more personalized and illness-tailored than generic personal informatics tools and more preemptive and broadly deployable than traditional clinical treatments. My work largely engages people with bipolar disorder.

6 publications
3 talks
2 workshops
More details...

Publications:

Murnane, E. L., Walker, T. G., Tech, B., Voida, S., & Snyder, J. (2018). Personal Informatics in Interpersonal Contexts: Towards the Design of Technology that Supports the Social Ecologies of Long-Term Mental Health Management. In Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 2(CSCW). pp 127. ACM. [PDF] [ACM]
Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., Snyder, J., Guha, S., Chang, P., Doherty, G., & Gay, G. (2017). The Double-Edged Sword: A Mixed Methods Study of the Interplay Between Bipolar Disorder and Technology Use. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, pp 288-300.
[PDF] [ScienceDirect]
Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., & Snyder, J. (2017). Quantifying the Changeable Self: The role of self-tracking in coming to terms with and managing bipolar disorder. Human-Computer Interaction, pp 1-34.
[PDF] [Taylor & Francis]
Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., & Gay, G. (2016). Opportunities for Technology in the Self-Management of Mental Health. In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct (MobileHCI'16). pp 1093-1096. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Matthews, M., Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Voida, S., Choudhury, T., Gay, G., & Frank, E. (2016). Development and evaluation of a smartphone-based measure of social rhythms for bipolar disorder. Assessment, 23(4) 472-483.
[PDF] [Sage]
Murnane, E. L., Cosley, D., Chang, P., Guha, S., Frank, E., Gay, G., & Matthews, M. (2016). Self-Monitoring Practices, Attitudes, and Needs of Individuals with Bipolar Disorder: Implications for the Design of Technologies to Manage Mental Health. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 23(3), pp 477-484.
[PDF] [Oxford]

Talks:

Personal Informatics in Interpersonal Contexts: Towards the Design of Technology that Supports the Social Ecologies of Long-Term Mental Health Management. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CSCW'18 in Jersey City, NY on November 6, 2018.
[Slides]
Quantifying the Changeable Self: The role of self-tracking in coming to terms with and managing bipolar disorder. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'18 in Montreal, Canada on April 25, 2018.
[CHI Talk Recording] [Slides]
Opportunities for Technology in the Self-Management of Mental Health. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the MobileHCI'16 Workshop on Mobile Healthcare for the Self-Management of Chronic Diseases and the Empowerment of Patients in Florence, Italy on September 6, 2016.
[Slides]

Organized Workshops:

The 3rd International Workshop on Mental Health and Well-being: Sensing and Intervention (MHSI'18). Organized by Saeed Abdullah, Akane Sano, Elizabeth Murnane, Mirco Musolesi, Jakob Bardram, Sandra Servia, and Tanzeem Choudhury at UbiComp'18 in Singapore on October 12, 2018.
[PDF] [ACM] [Workshop website]
The 2nd International Workshop on Mental Health and Well-being: Sensing and Intervention (MHSI'17). Organized by Saeed Abdullah, Elizabeth Murnane, Mirco Musolesi, Jakob Bardram, and Tanzeem Choudhury at UbiComp'17 in Maui, Hawaii on September 11, 2017.
[PDF] [ACM] [Workshop website]

Screenshots:

MoodRhythm's self-report screen Reports and feedback about behavior and mood Metrics of stability Badges rewarding adherence to self-monitoring

ClockWise

Nearly all neurobehavioral and physiological processes, from cognitive performance to sleep-wake cycles, follow roughly 24 hour patterns known as circadian rhythms. The goal of the ClockWise project is to advance a vision of "circadian computing" — a novel class of technologies that can passively sense and, in turn, provide feedback and interventions suited to an individual's personal daily rhythms.

6 publications
5 talks
1 press
1 grant
More details...

My contributions to ClockWise focus on using domain knowledge from chronobiology to develop lightweight algorithms for passively sensing various dimensions of daily neurobehavioral functioning (e.g., sleep, alertness, mood) as well as to design chronobiology-aware informatics tools that deliver ambient and actionable behavioral feedback to stabilize and support individual rhythms.

Publications:

Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., & Choudhury, T. (2017). Circadian Computing: Sensing, Modeling, and Maintaining Biological Rhythms. In Mobile Health: Sensors, Analytic Methods, and Applications, editors James M. Rehg, Susan A. Murphy, & Santosh Kumar. pp 35-58. Springer.
[PDF] [Springer]
Murnane, E. L., Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Kay, M., Cosley, D., Choudhury, T., Gay, G., & Kientz J. A. (2017). Exploring the Design Space of Chronobiology-Aware Health Tools. In CHI'17 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM. (To appear).
[PDF] [ACM]
Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., Kay, M., Kientz, J. A., Gay, G., & Choudhury, T. (2016). Cognitive Rhythms: Unobtrusive and Continuous Sensing of Alertness Using a Mobile Phone. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'16). pp 178-189. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Murnane, E. L., Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Kay, M., Kientz, J. A., Choudhury, T., Gay, G., & Cosley, D. (2016). Mobile Manifestations of Alertness: Connecting Biological Rhythms with Patterns of Smartphone App Use. In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (MobileHCI'16). pp 465-477. ACM. [PDF] [ACM]
Murnane, E. L., Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Choudhury, T., & Gay, G. (2015). Social (media) jet lag: How usage of social technology can modulate and reflect circadian rhythms. In Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'15). pp 843-854. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., Gay, G., & Choudhury, T. (2014). Towards circadian computing: early to bed and early to rise makes some of us unhealthy and sleep deprived. In Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'14). pp 673-684. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Exploring the Design Space of Chronobiology-Aware Health Tools. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'17 in Denver, Colorado on May 7, 2017.
[Slides]
Mobile Manifestations of Alertness: Connecting Biological Rhythms with Patterns of Smartphone App Use. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at MobileHCI'16 in Florence, Italy on September 9, 2016.
[Slides]
Passive Sensing of Circadian Rhythms for Individualized Models of Cognitive Performance. Presented by Saeed Abdullah and Elizabeth Murnane for Health Data Exploration Project Agile Grant Webinar Series on February 11, 2016.
[Slides] [Video]
Social (media) jet lag: How usage of social technology can modulate and reflect circadian rhythms. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at UbiComp'15 in Osaka, Japan on September 10, 2015.
[Slides]
Circadian computing: Towards a body clock friendly smartphone. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the CHI'14 Workshop on Biological Rhythms and Technology in Toronto, Canada on April 27, 2014.
[Slides]

Press:

Staying in Sync. By Amanda Garris in PeriodiCALS, April 14, 2017.
[Article]

Grant:

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Passive Sensing of Circadian Rhythms for Individualized Models of Cognitive Performance. Role: Co-lead author of proposal. PI: Julie Kientz. $36,772. 03/15 - 08/15.
[Abstract]

Screenshots and mockups:

Chronic Pain

This project develops novel assessment and therapy tools that enhance both the study and treatment of chronic pain in a cost-effective, individualized, and broadly scalable manner.

3 publications
2 talks
1 app
1 grant
More details...

As a subjective experience, self-report is considered essential to measuring and, in turn, treating pain. Through user-centered design approaches, lab studies, and field trials, a main focus of this research is on developing novel interfaces and tangible devices that support accurate, quick, and repeated use along with other participant-valued interactions (e.g., discreet, intuitive, highly manipulable).

Currently, I am broadly deploying these assessment tools as part of research aimed at (1) gathering a dataset of in-situ, temporally-granular pain intensity measurements, (2) computationally modeling and predicting idiosyncratic patterns in pain intensity and its contributing factors, to (3) develop intervention tools personalized around the rhythms of an individual's condition. Another thread of this project is additionally examining more psychosocial aspects of managing pain, by studying pain-related disclosures on online social platforms.

Publications:

Sannon, S., Murnane, E. L., Bazarova, N., Gay, G. (2019). "I was really, really nervous posting it": Communicating about Invisible Chronic Illness across Social Media Platforms. In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'19). (To appear). ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Adams, A. T., Murnane, E. L., Adams, P., Elfenbein, M., Chang, P. F., Sannon, S., Gay, G., & Choudhury, T. (2018). Keppi: A Tangible User Interface for Self-Reporting Pain. In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'18). pp 502. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Adams, P., Murnane, E. L., Elfenbein, M., Wethington, E., & Gay, G. (2017). Supporting the Self-Management of Chronic Pain Conditions with Tailored Momentary Self-Assessments. In Proceedings of the 35th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'17). pp 1065-1077. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Keppi: A Tangible User Interface for Self-Reporting Pain. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'18 in Montreal on April 26, 2018.
[CHI Talk Recording] [Slides]
Supporting the Self-Management of Chronic Pain Conditions with Tailored Momentary Self-Assessments. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'17 in Denver, Colorado on May 8, 2017.
[Slides]

App:

Smartphone application available for Android

Grant:

National Institutes of Health through the Translational Research Institute on Pain in Later Life. The rhythms of chronic pain: Developing technology for measuring, modeling, and predicting individualized pain patterns in everyday life. PI: Elizabeth Murnane. $31,300. 6/1/18 - 5/31/19.

NutriPhone

This project develops rapid diagnostic tools for resource-limited settings, with a specific focus on novel hardware that minimizes user error and can be reliably and inexpensively deployed at the point-of-care as well as software that optimizes accurate interpretation of diagnostic outputs.

2 publications
More details...

Publications:

Hohenstein, J. C., O'Dell, D., Murnane, E. L., Lu, Z., Erickson, D., & Gay, G. (2017). Enhancing the Usability of an Optical Reader System to Support Point-of-Care Rapid Diagnostic Testing: An Iterative Design Approach. Journal of Medical Internet Research Human Factors, 4(4).
[PDF] [JMIR]
Hohenstein, J. C., Baumer, E. P., Reynolds, L., Murnane, E. L., O'Dell, D., Lee, S., Guha, S., Qi, Y., Rieger, E., & Gay, G. (2017). Supporting Accurate Interpretation of Self-Administered Medical Test Results for Mobile Health: Assessment of Design, Demographics, and Health Condition. Journal of Medical Internet Research Human Factors, 5(1).
[PDF] [JMIR]

Smoking Cessation

During my internship at Microsoft Research, I conducted quantitative and qualitative analyses of Twitter users' content and activities to explore personal, behavioral, and social factors predictive of abstinence or relapse during smoking cessation attempts. Going forward, I hope to expand this research to the design and deployment of adaptive smoking intervention technologies that can leverage such modeling in order to personalize support.

1 publication
1 talk
1 video
More details...

Collaborators:

Publication:

Murnane, E. L. & Counts, S. (2014). Unraveling abstinence and relapse: smoking cessation reflected in social media. In Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'14). pp 1345-1354. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

Unraveling Abstinence and Relapse: Smoking Cessation Reflected in Social Media. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'14 in Toronto, Canada on April 29, 2014.
[Slides]

Video:

Unraveling Abstinence and Relapse: Smoking Cessation Reflected in Social Media. CHI 2014 submission video.
[Video]

Domain-Driven Development

My dissertation focused on demonstrating how “domain-driven” strategies that root development choices (e.g., construction of datasets and selection of analytic methods) in scientific knowledge from a given application area (e.g., chronobiology, disease etiology, behavioral theory) enable the creation of informatics systems that are better at (1) accurately assessing the factors most salient to a given health outcome and (2) delivering feedback that is more personalized, interpretable, and well-received by users.

1 thesis
1 publication
1 talk
1 poster
More details...

Compared to purely data-driven approaches, my domain-driven algorithms were more accurate in detecting and predicting health indicators of interest and also required less computational resources in terms of both processing power and storage space. Going forward, I am examining the ability of domain-driven approaches to help counteract an increasingly well-recognized algorithmic (un)fairness problem that can arise when the statistical patterns that models learn over time are built on biased data that reinforce existing, systematic health disparities that often align with differential societal outcomes related to age, gender, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status.

Thesis:

Murnane, E. L. (2017). A Framework for Domain-Driven Development of Personal Health Informatics Technologies.

Publication:

Murnane, E. L. (2015). Exploring a theory-guided path to the design of personal informatics and intervention technologies. UbiComp Doctoral School. In Adjunct Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'15) and Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC'15). pp 447-452. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

Domain-Driven Personalization of Personal Informatics and Intervention Technologies. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the UbiComp'15 Doctoral School in Osaka, Japan on September 7, 2015.
[Slides]

Poster:

Exploring a theory-guided path to the design of personal informatics and intervention technologies. At the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp), September 2015.
[Poster]

Novel Feedback for Informatics and Intervention

While quantitative representations of personal data (charts, graphs, statistical reports) typify most modern personal informatics tools, growing evidence suggests that such feedback can not only fail to address users' needs and reflect their lived experiences but can actually harm motivation and self-integrity. Aiming to rethink those conventional formats, these projects implement alternative information encoding strategies for informatics and intervention interfaces, including to explore a notion of the qualified self that involves engaging with data through narrative, metaphor, and play.

WhoIsZuki

This project develops behavior change systems that promote sustained engagement through data-driven narratives that ambiently visualize a user’s activities and goals as components of a multi-chapter story, where the progress of the main character (Zuki) is tied to that of the user.

1 publication
1 poster
1 video
1 grant
More details...

Originally developed to support general physical activity related goals, we are currently extending the WhoIsZuki platform to other specialized use cases. In particular, we are working on senior osteoarthritis and mobility, which involves incorporating a social component given its known benefits in older adult health management contexts, as well as delivering actionable and adaptive activity recommendations tailored both per person and over time.

Collaborators:

Andrew Barakat, Victor Chahuneau, Sunny Consolvo, Alia Crum, Scott Delp, David Huffaker, Cindy Jiang, Anna Kong, Gueorgi Kossinets, James Landay, Paula Moya, Michelle Park, Connor Soohoo, Luke Vink, Shi Weili, Iris Xia, Yu Xin, John Yang-Sammataro, Octavia Zahrt, Patrick Zhang, Jenny Zhi

Publication:

Murnane, E. L., Huffaker, D., & Kossinets, G. (2015). Mobile health apps: adoption, adherence, and abandonment. In Adjunct Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'15) and Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISCW'15). pp 261-264. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Poster:

Murnane, E. L., Huffaker, D., & Kossinets, G. (2015). Mobile health apps: adoption, adherence, and abandonment. In Adjunct Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'15) and Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISCW'15). pp 261-264. ACM.
[Poster]

Video:

Ambient Narrative-Based Interfaces to Shape Positive Mindsets and Motivate Sustained Behavior.
[Video]

Grant:

Stanford Catalyst for Collaborative Solutions to Future Grand Challenges. Motivating Mobility and Health on a Global Scale. Role: Key contributor to proposal. PI: Scott Delp. $2,222,223. 07/01/18 - 06/30/21.

Screenshots:

Metaphormation

This project develops metaphor-based information visualizations for both personal devices and public displays that are more intuitive, meaningful, and better resonate with the lived experiences those data represent.

1 publication
1 workshop
More details...

Most recently, this research is examining more collective informatics contexts, where data tracking and sensemaking practices may be socially motivated, collaboratively conducted, or otherwise extend beyond single-user audiences and requirements --- use cases for which graphical metaphors can help balance the benefits of sharing data and experiences, while providing a privacy-sensitive layer of abstraction.

Publication:

Snyder, J., Murnane, E. L., Lustig, C., Voida, S. (2019). Visually Encoding the Lived Experience of Bipolar Disorder. In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'19). (To appear). ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Organized Workshops:

Social Issues in Personal Informatics: Design, Data, and Infrastructure. Organized by Elizabeth Murnane, Jaime Snyder, Stephen Voida, Matthew Bietz, Mark Matthews, Sean Munson, and Laura Pina at CSCW'18 in Jersey City on November 4, 2018.
[PDF] [ACM] [Workshop website]

Installations and mockups:

Biofeedback and Wearables

Developing novel wearable devices and interfaces and conducting psychological experiments, this project investigates how the presentation of biofeedback (e.g., through haptic patterns or glanceable visualizations) impacts self-perceptions, behavior, and overall well-being.

1 poster
1 app
More details...

Specific outcomes of focus include anxiety regulation, stress, and physical activity. We are also particularly interested in how both the feedback's liminality (a person's subliminal vs. conscious awareness of it) and accuracy (e.g., viewing one's actual vs. inflated/deflated step count information or feeling haptic vibrations at one's actual vs. increased/decreased heart rate) influence cognitive reappraisal, physiological reaction, and behavioral action.

Collaborators:

Tanzeem Choudhury, Jean Costa, Alia Crum, Kristopher Evans, James Landay, Michelle Park, Mel Sampat, Bec Smith, Octavia Zahrt

Poster:

Evans, K., Zahrt, O., Crum, A., Landay, J., Murnane, E., Santoro, E. (2019). Wearable Fitness Trackers and Their Effects on Mindsets and Health: A Longitudinal Experiment. Presented at the Annual Convention of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP'19).
[PDF] [SPSP]

App:

AccuSteps application available for iPhone/iWatch

Tailormade Games

At the intersection of personal informatics and meaningful games, this project explores approaches to data capture, self-reflection, and behavioral intervention through play.

1 publication
1 talk
More details...

First, we are exploring the design space of game-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) that promotes adherence, data quality, and positive user experiences. Establishing a framework for using personal information in computer gaming ("tailor made" games), we are also building personal-data-driven games that extract information from sources such as Gmail and Facebook in order to support mindfulness, reflection, and reminiscence. Finally, we are developing games aimed at helping people pursue goals or manage health — for instance by incorporating biofeedback about mood and stress levels into custom games that deliver relaxation interventions to players.

Collaborators:

Publication:

Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., Gay, G., & Cosley, D. (2016). Playing with Your Data: Towards Personal Informatics Driven Games. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing Adjunct (UbiComp'16). pp 565-569. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

Playing with Your Data: Towards Personal Informatics Driven Games. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the UbiComp'16 New Frontiers of Quantified Self workshop in Heidelberg, Germany on September 12, 2016.
[Slides]

Demos:

Play Just Remember (Link coming soon)
Play PlayMail (Link coming soon)

Screenshots:

Smart Pensieve

This outgrowth from the Pensieve project explores how reminiscence triggers and memory anchors can be intelligently mined from an individual’s social media content in order to boost well-being, strengthen relationships, and support reflection.

More details...

Collaborators:

Demo:

Try Smart Pensieve (Link coming soon)

Smart Environments

Motivated by the idea that our homes, work places, schools, vehicles, streets, and other human-made contexts of daily activity are powerful yet under leveraged loci for improving individual, organizational, and societal level outcomes such as well-being, innovation, population lifespan, and environmental preservation, these projects develop aware and adaptive environments that benefit people and planet.

Hybrid Physical+Digital Spaces

Considering people in countries like the U.S. now spend 87% of their time indoors, with research increasingly indicating that building features (lighting, materials, iconography) can substantially impact occupants in terms of cognitive, physiological, psychological, and social outcomes, this project has several thrusts to develop technology that blends digital and physical infrastructure to not only nudge attitudes and behaviors but also continuously support wellness and lasting change.

1 grant
More details...

Specifically, our current efforts are focused on: 1) developing and deploying a robust data collection platform that integrates information from personal devices, self-report, and building sensors, 2) performing statistical analysis and machine learning on captured data to discover associations between building features and human states and generate hypotheses for iterative phases of controlled experiments, and 3) designing adaptations (e.g., digital surfaces and ambient elements - lighting, temperature, sound) that may be automated or occupant controlled to support both short and long term outcomes of interest including fostering creativity, encouraging movement, nudging sustainable behavior, reducing stress, and cultivating belongingness and community.

Collaborators:

Sarah Billington, Alana Conner, Catie Cuan, Isabella Douglas, Kyle Douglas, Michael Cooper, Martin Fischer, Gerry Hamilton, Jen King, Monica Lam, James Landay, Sarah Lyons-Padilla, Catherine Mullings, Pablo Paredes, Gabriel Saldivar, Sheri Sheppard, Alex Weitzman, Jackie Yang, Andrew Ying, Alice Zheng

Grant:

Stanford Catalyst for Collaborative Solutions to Future Grand Challenges. Hybrid Physical+Digital Spaces for Enhanced Sustainability and Wellbeing. Role: Lead author of proposal. PIs: Sarah Billington, James Landay. $920,000. 07/01/18 - 06/30/20.

Cars

These projects explore how technology can enhance in-car safety and experiences, including to reframe commuting and other inter-situational moments in the car as opportunities for mindfulness and stress reduction.

3 publications
More details...

Collaborators:

Publications:

Paredes, P. E., Qian, K., Balters, S., Murnane, E. L., Ordonez, F., Ju, W., & Landay, J. A. (2019). Driving with the Fishes: Towards Calming and Mindful Virtual Reality Experiences for the Car. In Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive Mobile Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies. (To appear). ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Balters, S., Murnane, E. L., Landay, J. A., & Paredes, P. (2018). Breath Booster! Exploring In-Car, Fast-Paced Breathing Interventions to Enhance Driver Arousal State. In Proceedings of the 12th EAI International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare. pp 128-137. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Paredes, P. E., Zhou, Y., Hamdan, N. A. H., Balters, S., Murnane, E. L., Ju, W., & Landay, J. A. (2018). Just Breathe: In-Car Interventions for Guided Slow Breathing. In Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies 2(1). pp 28. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Augmented Intelligence

These projects explore the application of AI to problems of social consequence in areas such as health and education, with a focus on solutions that are not only accurate but also adaptive, interactive, and user-centered.

AI-Assisted Healthcare

This project engages with opportunities where intelligent, interactive systems can help to address pressing challenges that face healthcare today.

1 course
More details...

Current projects focus on developing monitoring and intervention systems to reduce hand hygiene related hospital acquired infections as well as to support elder care and aging-in-place.

Collaborators:

Lance Downing, Fei-Fei Li, Michelle Guo, Albert Haque, James Landay, Lily Li, Amit Singh

Teaching:

CS337/MED277: AI-Assisted Health Care
[Course website]

Prototypes:

Childhood Education

This research is aimed at revolutionizing education via innovative interaction design and AI technology to address problems of inefficacy and inequality in childhood learning. Specifically, we are focusing on developing a tablet-based tutoring system that supports adaptive, context-aware, and augmented-reality based narratives and hands-on activities to foster children's independent learning, critical thinking, and sense of exploration and discovery.

1 publication
More details...

Publications:

Ruan, S., Jiang, L., Xu, J., Tham, B., Qiu, Z., Zhu, Y., Murnane, E. L., Brunskill, E., Landay, J. (2019). QuizBot: A Dialogue-based Adaptive Learning System for Factual Knowledge. In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'19). (To appear). ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Creative Drive

This project investigates how intelligent in-car agents can engage with drivers and passengers to guide creative activities and elicit novel ideas, in an effective, enjoyable, and safe manner.

1 grant
More details...

One main thread of the project focuses on car commuters, undertaking on-road studies to test the impact of driving on creative ideation as well as prototyping interactive media to prime and elicit creative behavior. The other arm of the project focuses on family-centered technologies, scaffolding everyday and intrinsically motivated parent-child interactions around knowledge sharing and conceptual learning — with our goal to not only enhance children’s cognitive development, communication skills, and family bonding, but to also assemble a massive labeled dataset of commonsense knowledge for training AI systems as a byproduct of these interactions.

Collaborators:

Michael Bernstein, Kat Gregory, Michelle Huang, Ranjay Krishna, James Landay, Dylan Moore

Grant:

SAIL-Toyota Center for AI Research. An Engagement Learning Approach to Generating Massive Labeled Datasets for Training AI Systems. Role: Lead author of proposal. PIs: Michael Bernstein, James Landay. $900,000. 9/1/18 - 8/31/20.

Civics

This research aims to improve the design of civic engagement technologies that are inclusive of the needs of both citizens and governing entities, as well as to develop computational methods for tracking and predicting population-level trends in areas such as health or crisis.

eGovernment

My research with the Cornell eRulemaking Initiative (CeRI) contributes towards an overarching goal of building online communities such as RegulationRoom that support public participation in government regulation-making processes.

1 publication
2 talks
1 press
1 grant
More details...

My projects focus on (a) improving targeted member recruitment by modeling traits (e.g., linguistic markers of self-efficacy, topic interest, and experiential knowledge) predictive of willing and effective contribution and (b) exploring design features that better motivate substantive participation and the transition from peripheral engagement to active contribution.

Publication:

McInnis, B., Murnane, E. L., Epstein, D., Cosley, D., & Leshed, G. (2016). One and Done: Factors affecting one-time contributors to ad-hoc online communities. In Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW'16). ACM. pp 609-623.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Designing an Online Civic Participation Platform: Socio-Computational Supports for Finding, Enlisting, and Motivating Contributors. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the Stanford HCI Seminar in Stanford, California on August 6, 2014.
[Slides]
Social-Computational Supports for Online Civic Engagement. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the Harvard Berkman Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts on March 4, 2014.
[Slides]

Press:

How Do We Participate in Rulemaking? By Alexandra Chang in Cornell Research, January 29, 2016.
[Article]

Grant:

National Science Foundation. Social-Computational Support of Civic Engagement in Public Policy Making. Role: Contributed to proposal writing. PI: Claire Cardie. $$2,279,876. 09/15/13 - 08/31/17.
[Abstract]

Societal Media

This project focuses on leveraging social media data to assess societal level phenomena including public mood or civil unrest.

2 publications
1 poster
More details...

Publications:

Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Costa, J. M., & Choudhury, T. (2015). Collective Smile: Measuring Societal Happiness from Geolocated Images. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW'15). ACM. pp 361-374.
[PDF] [ACM]
Costa, J., Rotabi, R., Murnane, E. L., & Choudhury, T. (2015). It Is Not Only About Grievances: Emotional Dynamics in Social Media During the Brazilian Protests. In Ninth International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM'15). pp 594-597.
[PDF] [AAAI]

Poster:

It Is Not Only About Grievances: Emotional Dynamics in Social Media During the Brazilian Protests. Ninth International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM), May 2015.
[Poster]

Semantic Web

This work focuses on leveraging existing large-scale linked datasets as well as building new domain-specific knowledge graphs in order to enrich various information retrieval, creation, and management tasks such as editing Wikipedia articles, programming source code, engaging with adaptive learning materials, or navigating geospatial data.

Linked Data

This project builds systems that connect with structured information sources like DBpedia in order to explore novel solutions to the Named Entity Disambiguation problem or support the exploration and annotation of semantically-enhanced historic maps.

1 publication
1 talk
1 poster
1 demo
1 codebase
More details...

Publication:

Murnane, E. L., Haslhofer, B., & Lagoze, C. (2013). RESLVE: leveraging user interest to improve entity disambiguation on short text. In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW'13) companion. IW3C2. pp 1275-1284. ACM.
  • Best Paper Award at Web of Linked Entities workshop (WoLE'13)
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

RESLVE: leveraging user interest to improve entity disambiguation on short text. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at WWW'13 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on May 13, 2013.
[Slides]

Poster:

RESLVE: leveraging user interest to improve entity disambiguation on short text. At the 22nd International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW), May 2013.
[Poster] [Poster Short Paper]

Demo:

Try out MapHub!

Codebase:

Codebase of the RESLVE system for performing Named Entity Disambiguation on social media text.
[GitHub]

NSF GRFP

In 2011, I was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship (GRFP) for my proposal "Context-Awareness and Semantic Models for Intelligent Adaptive Interfaces", which outlined a research agenda for mining digital footprints in order to model personal characteristics and build tailored tools that support individuals' management of their personal information and health-related behaviors.

In case my proposal might help guide or stimulate others' fellowship applications or broader research directions, I'm happy to share my Research Proposal, Personal Statement, and Previous Research Statement.

Past Projects

Before graduate school, my research included work both in industry at a startup I co-founded and in academia as an undergraduate researcher at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).

Architexa

I co-founded Architexa, a research and development MIT spin-off that designs visualization tools to help software developers better understand and share important aspects of source code.

2 publications
1 talk
2 posters
1 video
More details...

For 4 years, I was Architexa's lead developer and head of experimental features, during which time I spearheaded and implemented numerous projects such as visualizations to diagram code logic and runtime behavior as well as tools to automatically generate visual documentation about a codebase’s structure, interactions, or development history. A main focus was developing visualization techniques that addressed information overload challenges associated with complex codebases. I also worked on diagram-sharing plug-ins and an associated online social platform that facilitated programmers' collaborative practices and provided personalized recommendations for finding and contributing content.

Collaborators:

Abishek Rakshit, Vineet Sinha, Seth Rosen

Publications:

Murnane, E. L. & Sinha, V. (2008). Interactive exploration of compacted visualizations for understanding behavior in complex software. In Companion to the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA'08). pp 763-764. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Sinha, V., Murnane, E. L., Kurth, S. W., Liongosari, E. S., Miller, R., & Karger, D. (2008). Understanding code architectures via interactive exploration and layout of layered diagrams. In Companion to the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA'08). pp 745-746. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

Interactive Exploration of Compacted Visualizations for Understanding Behavior in Complex Software. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at OOPSLA'08 in Nashville, Tennessee on October 19, 2008.
[Demo Slides]

Posters:

Interactive exploration of compacted visualizations for understanding behavior in complex software. At the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA), October 2008.
[Poster]
Understanding code architectures via interactive exploration and layout of layered diagrams. At the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA), October 2008.
[Poster]

Video:

An Introduction to Architexa. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane. 2010.
[Video]

Relo

A project born of collaboration between the Haystack and User Interface Design research groups in the MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab, Relo is an IDE-plugin built on RDF that visualizes relationships within Java source code using interactive diagrams.

More details...

My work focused on studying how the level of detail shown in a visualization affects comprehension and developing new interaction techniques that enabled a user to manipulate the granularity and layout of displayed information. Additionally, I built visualizations to convey codebase evolution and implemented both visual aids to flag outdated information as well as handling for diagrams to automatically update based on changes in the represented code.

Collaborators:

City Browser

The goal of the Spoken Language Systems (SLS) research group in the MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab is to create conversational interfaces that enable humans to interact with computers via naturally spoken language. SLS's CityBrowser is a multimodal system that gives restaurant information in response to spoken or typed user inquiries.

More details...

My research focused on development of an intelligent recommendation agent that guided a user through interactions with CityBrowser and provided personalized suggestions for queries and restaurants.

Last updated December 2018