Elizabeth Murnane
emurnane@stanford.edu

My high-level research goal is to design, deploy, and evaluate novel computing technologies that support well-being, broadly construed. Currently, my work is largely aimed at personal health. Specifically, many of my projects are focused on developing: (1) applications and devices for capturing personal data manually or passively; (2) lightweight algorithms that leverage this data for user modeling and health assessment; and (3) interactive interfaces that deliver tailored feedback and interventions. In this way, I strive to make methodological, empirical, and HCI contributions.

To pursue these directions, I collaborate with an amazing set of colleagues and work on interdisciplinary teams with domain experts such as behavioral and social scientists, clinicians, critical theorists, and legal scholars. Through these partnerships I hope to continue pushing the boundaries of how systems can promote more positive experiences with and through technology, on individual, group, and societal levels.

ClockWise

Nearly all neurobehavioral and physiological processes, from cognitive performance to sleep-wake cycles, follow roughly 24 hour patterns known as circadian rhythms. The goal of the ClockWise project is to advance a vision of "circadian computing" — a novel class of technologies that can passively sense and, in turn, provide feedback and interventions suited to an individual's personal daily rhythms.

6 publications
5 talks
1 press
More details...

My contributions to ClockWise focus on (a) exploring how domain knowledge from chronobiology can provide more holistic explanations of why individuals use technology (e.g., social media and smartphones) in particular ways, (b) using this increased understanding of how technology usage may reflect underlying biological traits to develop lightweight algorithms for passively sensing those characteristics, and (c) designing circadian-aware informatics tools that deliver visualizations and actionable behavioral feedback to stabilize sleep and support individual rhythms of productivity.

Publications:

Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., & Choudhury, T. (2017). Circadian Computing: Sensing, Modeling, and Maintaining Biological Rhythms. In Mobile Health: Sensors, Analytic Methods, and Applications, editors James M. Rehg, Susan A. Murphy, & Santosh Kumar. pp 35-58. Springer.
[PDF] [Springer]
Murnane, E. L., Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Kay, M., Cosley, D., Choudhury, T., Gay, G., & Kientz J. A. (2017). Exploring the Design Space of Chronobiology-Aware Health Tools. In CHI'17 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM. (To appear).
[PDF] [ACM]
Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., Kay, M., Kientz, J. A., Gay, G., & Choudhury, T. (2016). Cognitive Rhythms: Unobtrusive and Continuous Sensing of Alertness Using a Mobile Phone. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'16). pp 178-189. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Murnane, E. L., Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Kay, M., Kientz, J. A., Choudhury, T., Gay, G., & Cosley, D. (2016). Mobile Manifestations of Alertness: Connecting Biological Rhythms with Patterns of Smartphone App Use. In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (MobileHCI'16). pp 465-477. ACM.
Best Paper Award (top 2 papers) & a 2016 Best of Computing selection.
[PDF] [ACM]
Murnane, E. L., Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Choudhury, T., & Gay, G. (2015). Social (media) jet lag: How usage of social technology can modulate and reflect circadian rhythms. In Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'15). pp 843-854. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., Gay, G., & Choudhury, T. (2014). Towards circadian computing: early to bed and early to rise makes some of us unhealthy and sleep deprived. In Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp'14). pp 673-684. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Exploring the Design Space of Chronobiology-Aware Health Tools. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'17 in Denver, Colorado on May 7, 2017.
[Slides]
Mobile Manifestations of Alertness: Connecting Biological Rhythms with Patterns of Smartphone App Use. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at MobileHCI'16 in Florence, Italy on September 9, 2016.
[Slides]
Passive Sensing of Circadian Rhythms for Individualized Models of Cognitive Performance. Presented by Saeed Abdullah and Elizabeth Murnane for Health Data Exploration Project Agile Grant Webinar Series on February 11, 2016.
[Slides] [Video]
Social (media) jet lag: How usage of social technology can modulate and reflect circadian rhythms. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at UbiComp'15 in Osaka, Japan on September 10, 2015.
[Slides]
Circadian computing: Towards a body clock friendly smartphone. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the CHI'14 Workshop on Biological Rhythms and Technology in Toronto, Canada on April 27, 2014.
[Slides]

Press:

Staying in Sync. By Amanda Garris in PeriodiCALS, April 14, 2017.
[Article]

Mental Health

I study the lived experiences and self-monitoring practices of individuals with mental health conditions in order to inform the design of technology for tracking, therapy, and intervention that are more illness-tailored than generic personal informatics tools and more broadly deployable than traditional clinical treatments. My work to date has focused on individuals with bipolar disorder.

5 publications
1 talk
1 workshop
More details...

Publications:

Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., Snyder, J., Guha, S., Chang, P., Doherty, G., & Gay, G. (2017). The Double-Edged Sword: A Mixed Methods Study of the Interplay Between Bipolar Disorder and Technology Use. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, pp 288-300.
[PDF] [ScienceDirect]
Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., & Snyder, J. (2017). Quantifying the Changeable Self: The role of self-tracking in coming to terms with and managing bipolar disorder. Human-Computer Interaction, pp 1-34.
[PDF] [Taylor & Francis]
Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., & Gay, G. (2016). Opportunities for Technology in the Self-Management of Mental Health. In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct (MobileHCI'16). pp 1093-1096. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Matthews, M., Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Voida, S., Choudhury, T., Gay, G., & Frank, E. (2016). Development and evaluation of a smartphone-based measure of social rhythms for bipolar disorder. Assessment, 23(4) 472-483.
[PDF] [Sage]
Murnane, E. L., Cosley, D., Chang, P., Guha, S., Frank, E., Gay, G., & Matthews, M. (2016). Self-Monitoring Practices, Attitudes, and Needs of Individuals with Bipolar Disorder: Implications for the Design of Technologies to Manage Mental Health. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 23(3), pp 477-484.
[PDF] [Oxford]

Talks:

Opportunities for Technology in the Self-Management of Mental Health. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at MobileHCI'16 in Florence, Italy on September 6, 2016.
[Slides]

Workshops:

The 2nd International Workshop on Mental Health and Well-being: Sensing and Intervention (MHSI). Organized by Saeed Abdullah, Elizabeth Murnane, Mirco Musolesi, Jakob Bardram, and Tanzeem Choudhury at UbiComp'17 in Maui, Hawaii on September 11, 2017.
[PDF] [ACM] [Workshop website]

Pain Management

Chronic pain is a prevalent, debilitating, and economically burdensome condition. As it is a subjective experience, self-report is considered essential to measuring and, in turn, treating pain. Through user-centered design approaches, lab studies, and field trials, this research develops novel smartphone interfaces and tangible devices that support accurate, quick, and repeated use along with other participant-valued interactions (e.g., discrete, intuitive, highly manipulable).

1 publication
1 talk
1 app
More details...

Publications:

Adams, P., Murnane, E. L., Elfenbein, M., Wethington, E., & Gay, G. (2017). Supporting the Self-Management of Chronic Pain Conditions with Tailored Momentary Self-Assessments. In Proceedings of the 35th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'17). pp 1065-1077. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Supporting the Self-Management of Chronic Pain Conditions with Tailored Momentary Self-Assessments. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'17 in Denver, Colorado on May 8, 2017.
[Slides]

App:

Smartphone application available for Android

Smoking Cessation

During my internship at Microsoft Research, I conducted quantitative and qualitative analyses of Twitter users' content and activities to explore personal, behavioral, and social factors predictive of abstinence or relapse during smoking cessation attempts. Going forward, I hope to expand this research to the design and deployment of adaptive smoking intervention technologies that can leverage such modeling in order to personalize support.

1 publication
1 talk
1 video
More details...

Collaborators:

Publication:

Murnane, E. L. & Counts, S. (2014). Unraveling abstinence and relapse: smoking cessation reflected in social media. In Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'14). pp 1345-1354. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

Unraveling Abstinence and Relapse: Smoking Cessation Reflected in Social Media. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at CHI'14 in Toronto, Canada on April 29, 2014.
[Slides]

Video:

Unraveling Abstinence and Relapse: Smoking Cessation Reflected in Social Media. CHI 2014 submission video.
[Video]

Tailor-made Games

At the intersection of personal informatics and meaningful games, this project explores approaches to data capture, self-reflection, and behavioral intervention through play.

1 publication
1 talk
2 demos
More details...

First, we are exploring the design space of game-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) that promotes adherence, data quality, and positive user experiences. Establishing a framework for using personal information in computer gaming ("tailor made" games), we are also building personal-data-driven games that extract information from sources such as Gmail and Facebook in order to support mindfulness, reflection, and reminiscence. Finally, we are developing games aimed at helping people pursue goals or manage health — for instance by incorporating biofeedback about mood and stress levels into custom games that deliver relaxation interventions to players.

Collaborators:

Publication:

Murnane, E. L., Matthews, M., Gay, G., & Cosley, D. (2016). Playing with Your Data: Towards Personal Informatics Driven Games. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing Adjunct (UbiComp'16). pp 565-569. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Playing with Your Data: Towards Personal Informatics Driven Games. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at UbiComp'16 in Heidelberg, Germany on September 12, 2016.
[Slides]

Screenshots:

Demos:

Play PlayMail (Link coming soon)
Play Just Remember (Link coming soon)

Smart Pensieve

This outgrowth from the Pensieve project explores how reminiscence triggers and memory anchors can be intelligently mined from an individual’s social media content in order to elicit feelings of well-being, strengthen interpersonal relationships, and support personal reflection about the past.

1 demo
More details...

Collaborators:

Demo:

Try Smart Pensieve (Link coming soon)

Societal Media

This project focuses on leveraging social media data to assess societal level phenomena including public mood or civil unrest.

2 publications
1 poster
More details...

Publications:

Abdullah, S., Murnane, E. L., Costa, J. M., & Choudhury, T. (2015). Collective Smile: Measuring Societal Happiness from Geolocated Images. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW'15). ACM. pp 361-374.
[PDF] [ACM]
Costa, J., Rotabi, R., Murnane, E. L., & Choudhury, T. (2015). It Is Not Only About Grievances: Emotional Dynamics in Social Media During the Brazilian Protests. In Ninth International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM'15). pp 594-597.
[PDF] [AAAI]

Poster:

It Is Not Only About Grievances: Emotional Dynamics in Social Media During the Brazilian Protests. At ICWSM'15, May 2015. Oxford, United Kingdom.
[Poster]

eGovernment

My research with the Cornell eRulemaking Initiative (CeRI) contributes towards an overarching goal of building an online eGovernment community known as RegulationRoom that supports public participation in government regulation-making processes.

1 publication
2 talks
1 press
More details...

My projects focus on (a) improving targeted member recruitment by modeling traits (e.g., linguistic markers of self-efficacy, topic interest, and experiential knowledge) predictive of willing and effective contribution and (b) exploring design features that better motivate substantive participation and the transition from peripheral engagement to active contribution.

Publication:

McInnis, B., Murnane, E. L., Epstein, D., Cosley, D., & Leshed, G. (2016). One and Done: Factors affecting one-time contributors to ad-hoc online communities. In Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW'16). ACM. pp 609-623.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talks:

Designing an Online Civic Participation Platform: Socio-Computational Supports for Finding, Enlisting, and Motivating Contributors. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the Stanford HCI Seminar in Stanford, California on August 6, 2014.
[Slides]
Social-Computational Supports for Online Civic Engagement. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at the Harvard Berkman Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts on March 4, 2014.
[Slides]

Press:

How Do We Participate in Rulemaking? By Alexandra Chang in Cornell Research, January 29, 2016.
[Article]

Linked Data

This work focuses on leveraging existing large-scale linked datasets as well as building new domain-specific knowledge graphs in order to enrich various information retrieval, creation, and management tasks such as editing Wikipedia articles, programming code, or interacting with maps.

1 publication
1 talk
1 poster
1 demo
1 codebase
More details...

To-date, I have worked on building systems that connect with structured information sources like DBpedia in order to explore novel solutions to the Named Entity Disambiguation problem or support the exploration and annotation of semantically-enhanced historic maps.

Publication:

Murnane, E. L., Haslhofer, B., & Lagoze, C. (2013). RESLVE: leveraging user interest to improve entity disambiguation on short text. In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW'13) companion. IW3C2. pp 1275-1284. ACM.
Best Paper Award at Web of Linked Entities workshop (WoLE'13).
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

RESLVE: leveraging user interest to improve entity disambiguation on short text. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at WWW'13 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on May 13, 2013.
[Slides]

Poster:

RESLVE: leveraging user interest to improve entity disambiguation on short text. At WWW'13 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on May 2013.
[Poster] [Poster Short Paper]

Demo:

Try out MapHub!

Codebase:

Codebase of the RESLVE system for performing Named Entity Disambiguation on social media text.
[GitHub]

NSF GRFP

In 2011, I was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship (GRFP) for my proposal "Context-Awareness and Semantic Models for Intelligent Adaptive Interfaces", which outlined a research agenda for mining digital footprints in order to model personal characteristics and build tailored tools that support individuals' management of their personal information and health-related behaviors.

In case my proposal might help guide or stimulate others' fellowship applications or broader research directions, I'm happy to share my Research Proposal, Personal Statement, and Previous Research Statement.

Past Projects

Before graduate school, my research included work both in industry at a startup I co-founded and in academia as an undergraduate researcher at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).

Architexa

I co-founded Architexa, a research and development oriented MIT spin-off that designs visualization tools to help software developers better understand and share important aspects of source code.

2 publications
1 talk
2 posters
1 video
More details...

For 4 years, I was Architexa's lead developer and head of experimental features, during which time I spearheaded and implemented numerous projects such as visualizations to diagram code logic and runtime behavior as well as tools to automatically generate visual documentation about a codebase’s structure, interactions, or development history. A main focus was developing visualization techniques that addressed information overload challenges associated with complex codebases. I also worked on diagram-sharing plug-ins and an associated online social platform that facilitated programmers' collaborative practices and provided personalized recommendations for finding and contributing content.

Collaborators:

Abishek Rakshit, Vineet Sinha, Seth Rosen

Publications:

Murnane, E. L. & Sinha, V. (2008). Interactive exploration of compacted visualizations for understanding behavior in complex software. In Companion to the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA'08). pp 763-764. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]
Sinha, V., Murnane, E. L., Kurth, S. W., Liongosari, E. S., Miller, R., & Karger, D. (2008). Understanding code architectures via interactive exploration and layout of layered diagrams. In Companion to the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA'08). pp 745-746. ACM.
[PDF] [ACM]

Talk:

Interactive Exploration of Compacted Visualizations for Understanding Behavior in Complex Software. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane at OOPSLA'08 in Nashville, Tennessee on October 19, 2008.
[Demo Slides]

Posters:

Interactive exploration of compacted visualizations for understanding behavior in complex software. At OOPSLA'08, October, 2008. Nashville, Tennessee.
[Poster]
Understanding code architectures via interactive exploration and layout of layered diagrams. At OOPSLA'08, October, 2008. Nashville, Tennessee.
[Poster]

Video:

An Introduction to Architexa. Presented by Elizabeth Murnane. 2010.
[Video]

Relo

A project born of collaboration between the Haystack and User Interface Design research groups in the MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab, Relo is an IDE-plugin built on RDF that visualizes relationships within Java source code using interactive diagrams.

More details...

My research focused on studying how the level of detail shown in a visualization affects comprehension and developing new interaction techniques that enabled a user to manipulate the granularity and layout of displayed information. Additionally, I built visualizations to convey codebase evolution and implemented both visual aids to flag outdated information as well as handling for diagrams to automatically update based on changes in the represented code.

Collaborators:

City Browser

The goal of the Spoken Language Systems (SLS) research group in the MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab is to create conversational interfaces that enable humans to interact with computers via naturally spoken language. SLS's CityBrowser is a multimodal system that gives restaurant information in response to spoken or typed user inquiries.

More details...

My research focused on development of an intelligent recommendation agent that guided a user through interactions with CityBrowser and provided personalized suggestions for queries and restaurants.

Last updated September 2017