Shivaram Lingamneni

About me

I have graduated from Stanford, but I have this webspace and the associated e-mail address for life.

As of August 2011, I'm a student in Berkeley's Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science.

From July 2009 to July 2011, I was at Yelp. I'm still involved there.

My permanent e-mail address is some combination of the following strings: "cs.stanford.edu", "@", "slingamn".

I have several other e-mail addresses as well. If you're using an address at gmail.com, berkeley.edu, or math.berkeley.edu, don't worry; they all forward to the same place. However, my address at stanford.edu (without the "cs") has expired and shouldn't be used.

This URL (https://cs.stanford.edu/people/slingamn/) will probably eventually become my OpenID.

The GPG public key for the abovementioned permanent e-mail address is here.

I also have a Gravatar.

Work

As of May 2016, here's my take on the philosophical status of the continuum hypothesis.

As of summer 2013, I have a draft of a new philosophy paper, called Frequentism as a positivism: a three-tiered account of probability. It replies to Alan Hajek's criticisms of frequentism, proposes a different conception of what frequency probability is, and tries for an integrated picture of different notions of probability.

I wrote a paper for a spring 2012 philosophy seminar, discussing a recent exchange between Adam Elga and Julian Jonker. It's called Against the possibility of a formal account of rationality. A brief summary: it's about potential implications of P vs. NP and the exponential time hypothesis for the meaning of "rationality".

Here's the one public piece of code I've worked on that I'm not excessively embarrassed by: a fast templating language for Python called EZIO.

More generally, I'm trying to version the current state of my philosophical positions using git. I'm just getting started with this, but the repository is here and up-to-date compiled versions should be here. My GitHub account also has a few personal projects.

Teaching

My teaching website is here.

I've written a couple of teaching handouts that may be of interest, since I intended them to fill perceived gaps in existing materials: